A new Gacy investigation or just more talk about investigating?

Evan-Amos/Creative Commons

Evan-Amos/Creative Commons

The news that Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez finally responded to Sheriff Tom Dart’s request for a search warrant for 6114 W. Miami with a long-overdue thumbs up was welcome indeed. That’s not to say that we’re popping corks around here.

There’s ample reason to believe that Gacy got up to no good at 6114 W. Miami. But the authorities have known about that evidence since Gacy was arrested in 1978.

In fact Bill Dorsch’s original hunch, which he reported upon Gacy’s arrest, led to a brief investigation in 1998, years after Gacy had been executed for his crimes. The investigation raised more questions than it answered, and turned up nothing of substance. Among the questions are whether anyone involved really wanted to find anything or whether it was easier to let Gacy and his hellish legacy rest.

But the relatives of people who might be buried there likely would prefer to be reunited with the remains. For that reason Dorsch has continued to press for results. He’s met resistance and ridicule every step of the way.

Now it appears the pressure Dorsch created–partly by finding eyewitnesses, recording their testimony, and handing it over to various members of law enforcement–has made it impossible for Dart, and finally Alvarez, to ignore the facts. They say they plan to bring in ground-scanning technology to locate any areas where the ground may have been disturbed.

Doubtless the anomalies that were revealed by ground-scanning technology in 1998 will show up again. If they do, investigators will dig out some core samples and have them examined by corpse-sniffing dogs. That sounds promising, though as Dorsch is fond of saying when we talk about how a new investigation might go, “Whose dogs?”

Sources close to the 1998 search say they examined the two most likely spots and found nothing so they quit. Were they likely spots? That’s a matter of dispute, actually, but we can hope that the same methods won’t be employed here.

If the results from two tiny core samples are inconclusive, will the investigation end there?

It’s on.

Alvarez: Go for it.

Alvarez: “Yeah, OK I guess.”

Bill Dorsch deserves a good night’s sleep tonight. If Michael Sneed’s report, just posted online, is correct, the sheriff’s finally been given the go-ahead by the state’s attorney to perform a search for additional victims of the serial killer John Wayne Gacy at the apartment building where Gacy worked as a caretaker in the mid-70s.

The capitulation comes on a Friday night, a time carefully chosen, no doubt, to attract the least possible attention. Local politicos typically use Friday to announce stories they want to get buried in the news cycle by whatever happens over the weekend. Good luck with that.

Previous posts here detail the testimony of various eyewitnesses who saw what seems in retrospect to be evidence that Gacy was boldly burying bodies at the corner of Miami and Elston, on Chicago’s northwest side.

Have a look at our exclusive videos and see if you’re as mystified as we’ve been about why it took so long for Sheriff Tom Dart and SA Anita Alvarez to agree that the property deserved a look.

One person and one person alone is responsible for any new discoveries. Former Chicago police detective William Dorsch had a hunch and he wouldn’t let it go. Hang on to your wig hats, there’s a lot more to come.